Saturday, 29 August 2015

Slow fashion and sustainability news: August edition

It's that time of month again, and my last post before I jet off for a much needed two weeks of sun, sea and sand! This month has been great for tips about ethical shopping, comment on changing consumer behaviour, and updates on both progress and potentially risky developments in the fashion industry. If you were in Scotland or the Netherlands, you might also have been to Zero Waste Scotland's "Future of Fashion – Love, Lease, Lend" talk on closed-loop production, visited Edinburgh's new sustainable textile workspace, or attended the first Symposium on Sustainable Fashion in Amsterdam.
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Tuesday, 25 August 2015

An Introduction to Dutch Eco Fashion

Amsterdam, during the Grachtenfestival (canal festival), which runs from 14th-23rd August 2015
The Netherlands is best known for its beautiful canals, rich trading history and the famous Koningsdag (King's Day), but in recent years it has also become one of the most exciting countries at the forefront of sustainability. Recent research by the Erasmus University and Circle Economy has shown that 8.1% of all Dutch jobs (810,000) are currently directly or indirectly contributing to the circular economy, whilst Eco Fashion World has described the Netherlands as "at the forefront of the ethical fashion movement", thanks in part to financial initiatives from the Dutch government and a strong history of innovative design in the country.

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Saturday, 22 August 2015

Selfridges' Bright New Things 2015 - Closing Soon!

You perhaps wouldn’t put the words ‘Selfridges’ and ‘sustainability’ together in the same sentence, but recently the luxury department store chain has been making waves in the industry, firstly by banning the sale of plastic water bottles and replacing them with drinking fountains, and more recently in the 2015 edition of their Bright New Things competition, which aims to find and develop future change leaders in the industry.
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Saturday, 15 August 2015

Free Sustainability Course - Starting Soon!


There's still time to sign up for the University of Bath's FREE course Make an Impact: Sustainability for Professionals, which starts in a couple of days on the 17th August and lasts for six weeks. Although it's aimed at professionals, the great thing is that there are no special requirements and you do all your learning at home - wherever in the world you're based - for only three hours each week.


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Monday, 10 August 2015

The Psychology Behind Fast Fashion: Comment by Der Spiegel magazine


I often find it interesting to compare how other countries approach sustainability, especially when green issues such as renewable energy and recycling are at the forefront of government policy. Even more fascinating is to observe how such countries react when international fast fashion retailers start to expand onto their shores, as Primark has done in places like Germany and the Netherlands over the last few years to great success, despite a higher level of consumer awareness of the ethical and environmental issues surrounding the products' manufacture. So why does the magic combination of overwhelming choice at bargain prices incite shopping madness into even the most knowledgable customers, and what can we do to change our mindset? In a recent article for Germany's Der Spiegel, Eleonora Pauli attempts to find the answers - check out the original article here, or read on for the English version.

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Wednesday, 5 August 2015

H&M's Fashion Recycling Week - Step in the Right Direction or Marketing Ploy?

An LCF student working on their installation for H&M's Fashion Recycling Week
News broke a couple of days ago that H&M is launching the first nationwide Fashion Recycling Week from 31st August to 6th September 2015 in collaboration with the London College of Fashion, which aims to raise customers' awareness of clothing waste and sustainability both in store and through the Instagram campaign #CloseTheLoop.
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